Completely Biased: Dark Witch Music Episode: Rudymical

Rhythm games can be wonderful. Out of all the genres in gaming, they’re usually the one to surprise me the most. They almost feel like they can be paired with any other genre for a creative mashing like nothing else. Just take a look at Crypt Of The Necrodancer, a fantastic RPG rhythm game which has all the elements of a traditional RPG, but then sets it to music and you time your moves to the music. It’s honestly just a great combination of two of my favorite types of games. Then we get Dark Witch Music Episode: Rudymical or as everyone will soon call it, DWMER. It’s a rhythm game that’s paired up with boss battles where you chop your way through enemy projectiles which in turn lowers the enemy’s health. It’s a cool concept, but it gets messy pretty quickly.


DWMER comes to you from the creators of The Legend of Dark Witch and all the other titles associated with said series. Now given that I haven’t played any of the games in the primary franchise, I can’t tell you how well this connects to or upholds the integrity of those games, but if this game is any indication of their quality, the franchise must have promise and some solid entertainment value. I’m not saying that you should expect anything grand, but for the price you pay, you’ll certainly be well entertained.

If I’m being completely honest, I bought this game out of frustration. I’ve been frustrated with the lack of games on the Nintendo Switch and when I saw this game, and its price, I decided that was more than enough to convince me. For the $7.99 price tag you get two playable characters right from the start, a handful of bosses/songs to choose from and a multiplayer mode. That’s not bad.


The way the game handles song selection is fairly unique. Each boss has their own song, but the unfortunate thing is that you can’t hear what the song will sound like until you start playing. It would have been nice if they included a preview to make it a little bit more like a traditional rhythm game. The battles are fun and pretty short and most the time the attacks line up with the rhythm of the songs well enough for you to get in some good combos. I did struggle a bit with the player character’s annoying yelping, but the developers thankfully took that into account and added a way to disable it from the settings in the main menu.


All in all it’s a fairly fun game. It’s got plenty of unlockables such players and bosses/songs and it’s got that two player mode as well. I wouldn’t tell anyone to rush out and buy this game, but if you’re just looking for something a little fun to kill some time in between sessions of Breath of The Wild then look no further.

Verdict: If you like to rhythmically hit balls, this game is for you.




QOTW: What’s Your Favorite Mario Kart Entry?

Since the launch of Mario Kart 8 Deluxe last Friday, my Switch has been getting a bunch of attention. Waiting for the game to drop on the eShop at midnight was one of the most exciting releases for me in recent memory apart from Persona 5 for obvious reasons. I adored Mario Kart 8 for the Wii U, it was one of my favorite games on that console and then when they added the Animal Crossing and Legend of Zelda DLC I became even more enamored. How could a company know exactly what I want? And how could they pull it off exactly how I wanted? That’s part of the greatness of Nintendo. They give us such wonderful and finely detailed products that leave us wanting more. So that got me to thinking: even with how great I think Mario Kart 8 Deluxe is, can I really call it my favorite? Is there another entry in the series that I love even more?

Almost all the people I know around my age got introduced to Mario Kart on the N64. It was a welcomed change of pace from the hectic onslaught that was Super Smash Bros and the intense space battles of Star Fox 64. It was something much more casual like Mario Party, but still had enough of an edge to it to make it competitive. It was a great fit for the console and the accompanying library of games.


But the game that really sold me on the series was Mario Kart: Double Dash for the GameCube. Talk about a beast of a game. With the cast of characters more than doubled from the previous entry and the addition of back seat drivers, special items, stats and dual items, the game added so much more complexity and engagement to the franchise that I was hooked.

Look at those choices.

But sadly, after that entry, none of the future games ever seemed to grab my interest. The Wii version was painfully forgettable and the ones for the handhelds never had the party nature of the game that I cherished so much.

Even with the incredible additions they put into Mario Kart 8 Deluxe, Mario Kart: Double Dash remains to be my favorite in the series to this day.

So, what about you? What’s your favorite entry in the franchise?


Written by G. S. Martin

Caleb Gillen’s Five Most Influential Video Games

Ah, video games: by the time I was in college, I began to truly appreciate the way that video games have helped to mold my life into what it is right now. I started with Sonic the Hedgehog when I was 3 or 4 and now, it’s been a lifelong hobby. So, to celebrate the 20+ years I’ve spent playing video games, as well as my introduction into Truly Abrasive, I’m going to talk to you about the games that have had the largest influence on me over time.

These are in no particular order.

Super Smash Bros (N64)

So, the Nintendo 64 was my first console, ever. I had a Game Boy Color first for my fifth birthday but the Nintendo 64 was the iconic system of my early childhood, not unlike a ton of nineties kids. One of the first games that came with the system was Super Smash Bros, and there’s a good reason why I’m not putting any of its much-improved sequels on here.smash.png

Afternoons with my uncle were spent desperately trying to beat his Captain Falcon. For characters other than Mario, Kirby, Link, and Pikachu this was really my first interaction with every other Nintendo character. I mean, I’m not sure if I would have ever played any of the Metroid series, Star Fox series, or Earthbound without playing this game first.

Another big thing that made this game extremely influential was its longevity. I rarely played Melee outside of other friends’ houses, even if Melee was objectively better. My family gathered to watch or play Smash 64 at almost every gathering. From ages 7 to 13, even if I rarely touched my N64, Smash was always a family mainstay. For a younger me, this was competitive gaming.

Kirby: Nightmare in Dreamland (GBA)

Let me just tell you, the ad to this thing was the most addictive thing in the universe as a child. You’ve got this fake sounding James Bond theme for Kirby, that was nonetheless catchy as heck. This game was released in what I call THE ERA OF KIRBY, the period of time when the anime ran, and both Nightmare in Dreamland and Kirby Air Ride were released. While I wasn’t able to enjoy Air Ride until around high school, Kirby: Nightmare in Dreamland was a mainstay for awhile.

The biggest complaint you can make about this game, or any Kirby game is that it’s too easy, but ten year old me had no issues with that. The big reason why this game was so influential isn’t due to the fact that it was my first Kirby game, (In fact, that was Kirby’s Dreamland, the original Game Boy game) but that it was another family experience.

My sister is not a gamer at all, but this was this was a game experience that both my sister and I shared and  we both love to this day. This game also taught me the value of short games like Kirby: there are no real long Kirby games that I can remember, but each one is slam dunk because of its lack of bloat.

kirby dreamland

3) Jet Set Radio Future (Xbox)

Jet Set Radio Future, for a while, was my white whale. The first convention I ever went to, Anime Boston 2006, had a place on the gaming floor for JSRF and I was absolutely blown away. I just kept on playing it and playing it and didn’t really know what the game was. It took until I got an Xbox 360 to get a copy of it and let me tell you: this is a franchise that desperately needs a sequel.

While the original Jet Set Radio didn’t age super well mechanically, it’s sequel is still sound in that regard. Jet Set Radio Future is an experiment that was born from an era of Tony Hawk games with realistic graphics, basically no story (besides the THUG games), and an American rock/rap playlist. The Jet Set Radio franchise is  Japan’s answer to those games, with outlandish graffiti graphics, a downright zany story, and an original Japanese soundtrack.

When I got Jet Set Radio Future, it taught me the value of art direction over graphics in an era where all my friends were talking about the graphics of sports games and Call of Duty. Aesthetics and art direction is king in the Jet Set Radio games, and it sure as hell aged a lot better than the realistic games of 2002.


4) Persona 4 (PS2)

Garrett beat me to this, but unlike him, I’m talking about my experience with the originalpersona4 Persona 4. This game, honestly, is hard to talk about because a lot of people have said a lot of things about it. For me, at this point, I had grown up with a ton of JRPGs, from Chrono Trigger to Final Fantasy 7 to Pokemon: the reason why they aren’t on this list is because Persona 4, at least before Persona 5 came out, was the apex of the JRPG for me.

I had played a bit of Persona 3 FES when I was in high school, but for a while I wasn’t as into video games as I was before, and was focusing on a ton of other stuff, particularly my anime fandom. I had heard a lot about Persona 4 before I started playing and despite it’s slow start, I was hooked.

Persona 4, in a lot of ways, showed me where turn-based RPGs had to go and where Japanese games in general were going. It, like Jet Set Radio Future, has amazing aesthetics but it’s gameplay and writing are incredibly strong. People are still talking about these characters, and their charm has led to at least a half a dozen spin-off games, and by god does this game deserve it.

5) The World Ends With You (iPhone/Android)

Ever play a game, read a book, or watch a movie that feels like it was made specifically for you? For me, that game was The World Ends With You. When I purchased TWEWY, I came from a background watching and playing stuff like Yu-Gi-Oh!, Mega Man Battle Network and Kingdom Hearts. The World Ends With You is basically the combination of all those elements I loved growing up in the most perfect way.

For me, the Pin-based, deck building gameplay was something I never knew I always wanted. For a while, I grew up thinking I hated the over complicated designs of Tetsuya Nomura, but The World Ends With You franchise proved me wrong, and let a more refined design shine through. The music, again like Jet Set Radio, is extremely distinct J-pop and J-rap and it’s a story has an extremely fleshed out setting and experience. The music and the fashion and trend mechanics only enhance the city of Shibuya Neku is trapped in.


The phone port was the first way I managed to experience the game in the early 2010s, and Neku’s story is in a great contrast to a lot of other Square Enix teenagers and protagonists. Neku starts off moody, his emotional arc throughout the story starts him at moody teenager who thinks he doesn’t needing anything, and ends him at accepting his feelings and learning that he can’t avoid his emotions. In a lot of ways, it’s about going from teenager to adult, and as I was in my first year of college when I started playing this, it was something I also needed to learn.

Written by Caleb Gillen


QOTW: How Do You Tackle Your Video Game Backlog?

I’ve amassed over 200 games for my PS4, over 40 for my 3DS and another 40 for my Vita. That’s not to mention all the games I own for my PS3 and steam account. Out of all of those games, I know I’ve only played about four or five dozen. That might sound like a lot, but when you put it against 300+ games, only playing fifty or sixty some odd games doesn’t really feel like much of a dent. It’s led me to question if I’ll ever get through my backlog of games.

What even qualifies as checking off a game on the list? Is it simply playing the game for a sufficient amount of time or do you actually have to beat the game?  My personal belief is that it’s when you’ve played the game enough to where you want to stop playing it. Whether or not that means you enjoy it enough to conquer it or enjoy it so little you uninstall it from your console, having a full experience, whether positive or negative seems like a good determining factor in my eyes. For instance, there are games like Tetris, how many times are you going to play that before you consider it a game you’ve fully experienced or experienced enough of to check it off your list? Granted this formula must be changed depending on the type of game you’re playing.

“I think I’ve got the hang of this.”

There’s the sense of obligation as well. I’ve purchased these games, why wouldn’t I play them? I clearly had enough interested to buy them in the first place. What is keeping me from playing them now? Is it just because I can go and play something safe and familiar instead? Is the risk worth the reward? What if I find out that I just spent all that time and money on something that’s garbage? A Lot of the time that’s what holds me back. “Oh man, this game looks so good…oh look there’s Destiny, a familiar shooter? Sounds good to me,” that kind of thing.

What I really want to know is: are there other ways to take down your backlog? What’s your preferred method? How many games have you gotten through and how many do you have left?

Let us know in the replies!

Written by G. S. Martin


Over A Month With The Nintendo Switch

I’ve never gotten a system at launch before. It has usually come down to not being able to afford the hefty price of the console or the device not being intriguing enough to win me over. This time the Switch launch covered both of those fields. Part of me wishes it hadn’t.

It’s been a month and a week since the March 3rd launch date and not much has changed with the system in that time. I haven’t seen any big game shipments or any major UI overhauls. The system launched with just a few games and unfortunately those games are still the only reason to purchase the system. Nothing in the last thirty-something days has convinced me that this game is a must purchase. Breath of The Wild was the console seller, but when you’re done with that what are you supposed to use the system for? I know that there’s only two weeks left until Mario Kart 8 Deluxe, but like a lot of people I finished BOTW right away. These two weeks seem like eternity since I haven’t had another game to play since the second week of the console launch.


All the other games that released simultaneously with the system were disappointing. Super Bomberman R was a lesser version of previously released games. Has Been Heroes has a ridiculous amount of luck behind its gameplay which makes it frustrating and an effort to enjoy. I keep forgetting that there might even be other games on the system. Sure, there’s Snake Pass, which is a cute and entertaining game, but it’s rarely anything special. That’s the problem with the games. They aren’t special. Nintendo has an habit of taking their primary franchises such as Mario, Zelda and Kirby and turning them into something magical, but we don’t have a Mario, we don’t have a Kirby. All we have is a Zelda that you could easily (and more properly) experience on the Wii U.


Now, the system itself is a delightful little bundle of fun, but if it doesn’t have the software then it’s all a moot point. I found myself enjoying VOEZ, a rhythm game that’s also available for mobile devices, more than any of the other content on the Switch. I’ve honestly been getting worried that I had made a poor purchase and that I should have gone with something else like the PS VR, but Nintendo just announced a new Nintendo Direct for April 12th to cover new Switch titles. I’m hoping for a release date for both Splatoon 2 and Arms. I want to know that another game is coming soon enough after Mario Kart. I want to have something to look forward to, but I don’t want that to be the case all the time. I want to be so caught up with what I’m playing that I don’t have to spend this much time processing my wait time for the next release.


Written by G. S. Martin


Breath Of The Wild Didn’t Blow Me Away

Breath of The Wild is a great game. The amount of detail the developers put into the game is probably unparalleled for any other Nintendo game. There are small intricacies that help define the world and connect the game to previous entries in the franchise to aid in pulling those nostalgic heartstrings. However, my heart strings weren’t tugged on at all. Nothing about my experience with Breath Of The Wild gave me a strong emotional response except for perhaps a few times of disappointment and frustration.

If you’re a longtime fan of the Zelda series, you know the drill with most of the games. You’re Link, the hero of time. You’ve got the same job, the same sword and the same methods of saving the world. You enter first dungeon, get the special weapon, beat the boss and head to the next area. Rinse and repeat until you get to Ganon or whoever the boss may be. The development team behind Breath of The Wild decided it was time to change up the formula and give the franchise a fresh new face to make it more inviting to new players while keeping the old ones. That’s quite a tall order and for the most part I would say they did a good job. Except for the fact that they took away a lot of things that made Zelda charming. While Breath Of The Wild boasts a story about exploration and impending doom, the exploration seems stale and familiar after the first thirty or forty shrines and the impending doom seems like a passing thought that sometimes pops up telling you “by the way, there’s a story here,” but most the time you can just shrug it off and go about your business. You really don’t have any sense of urgency in the need to take down Calamity Ganon. Sure, he did some bad things a hundred years ago, but everyone seems to be doing pretty well now. The towns seem cheerful and even the Zora are too busy being enamored by their prince to care about the looming threat.


But that’s not all. The divine beasts, which are Breath Of The Wild’s equivalent to dungeons, are bland, empty and terribly designed. Each one is just a handful of shrine puzzles shoved together, each one loosely tied together. They lack any kind of the traditional Zelda magic. There are no cool nooks and crannies to explore. There are no mini-bosses. There are no cool new weapons to find. Instead, the bosses have been replaced by mini Calamity Ganons that can easily just be defeated if you launch enough arrows at them. Who thought that was a creative design? Who thought that was interesting? But most importantly, who thought that was fun?

While we are talking about weapons, we should probably discuss the wildly divisive weapon system. All weapons are breakable. All of them. Sure, a rare few you can rebuild, but you can’t repair any of them. So if you really love that Guardian Spear, you better just hold on to it and save it for a good battle you don’t mind wasting it on because you aren’t going to get it back. While I understand why they implemented such a system, I don’t agree with how they went about it. There’s no problem having a system where a weapon gets damaged and weaker over time, but with such a flawed implementation, it just feels cheap. I understand that you want me to change up my fighting style and try out a variety of weapons, but what if I don’t want to? What if I really cherish my broadsword? Why can’t I go gather some materials and ore and repair the damn thing? It just seems a little lazy.

Unfortunately, laziness doesn’t begin to explain what went wrong with the story. How do you tell a story in a game about exploration? Simple. Make it as shallow as possible and hope they don’t take the time to explore everything to realize the lack of depth. You would think that with all the memories in the game, they would be able to create an engaging and tightly wound story, but because you can find the memories in practically any order, the story just comes off as disjointed and sloppy. Then there’s the lackluster voice acting. Zelda sounds like she’s trying to do a twist on a British accent, but fails badly. I can understand why the other characters have hit and miss moments given it’s the series’ first time doing voice acting, but wouldn’t you think they would put the most effort into one of the two stars of the franchise? All in all, the story, accompanied by weak voice acting and an anticlimactic final battle, left me wanting something more. I wanted to feel something. I wanted to like the story. I tried. I really did.


So, with all of this bashing on the game, you’d expect me to say I hate the game, right? Of course not. As I stated at the beginning of this article, it is a great game. It has plenty of things to enjoy like the awesome slow motion arrow shooting and the shield surfing, but it also has a lot of weak elements to it that will always keep me from calling it a masterpiece. If you are hesitant on playing the game, the one thing I want you to take away from this article is that it’s not a traditional Zelda game and while that may be fine for others, I feel as though they took away too much of what I have grown to love for years now. If that doesn’t bother you, I think you should try it out.


Written by G. S. Martin


Is The Scorpio A Hail Mary From Microsoft?

The short answer is: yes, but it’s one that is most promising. The Xbox One is well into its third year on the market and even though the console has a strong and dedicated following, the console is lagging behind its major competitor the PlayStation 4. The console itself boasts a hefty number of bells and whistles and a great backwards compatibility system, but is lacking in quality exclusive titles. With cancellations of highly anticipated games like Scalebound and Fable Legends, it’s no surprise that Xbox One consumers are a little worried at this point at the state of their exclusive gaming experience. Another thing to keep in mind is that the Xbox One S was just released in August of last year with mediocre sales.


This is where Microsoft’s new console, code-named Scorpio, comes in. Microsoft recently announced the specs of the Scorpio and it’s nothing to be laughed at boasting an impressive 12GB of GDDR5 RAM and a custom CPU and GPU. But why does this matter? According to Microsoft, it’s to win over developers. After seeing the initial stumble of the system and then the quick take off of the PS4, developers have found creating games for the PS4 to be easier and more beneficial. Microsoft hopes to change that with the Scorpio and honestly, I think they might be able to do it. In the interest of full disclosure, I’ve never been an Xbox fan and after briefly owning an Xbox One, I can’t imagine why I would purchase another Microsoft console with their wonky and clunky UI, unnecessary features and sparse library, but the Scorpio has me intrigued. They’re ditching the traditions we’ve expected of console generations. Instead of just releasing newer, slimmer and faster versions of the same product, they’re giving players a second a true and unique second option.

Scorpio Specs

Unfortunately, the announcement and the expected late 2017 release of the Scorpio does mean something else, Microsoft is desperate. It’s a little too familiar to something else that happened in the gaming world recently, namely the Nintendo Switch. The Wii U had a lot of similar problems to the Xbox One. I’m not going to say that the Xbox One is as bad off as the Wii U was because that certainly isn’t the case, but the correlations between the two are undeniable. The Wii U suffered for a couple years until its final breath this year with the release of the Switch and it looks like Microsoft is taking a page from Nintendo’s book. Instead of trying to salvage the current system which would take a huge amount of time and money, they’re betting all they have on one major attempt. The biggest things the Scorpio has going for it is that, unlike the Switch, it has a whole library of games from two previous generations to work with. Microsoft has announced the console will be able to play Xbox One and Xbox 360 games proving that their wonderful implementation of backwards compatibility won’t be leaving any time soon. But even with that and the new powerful specs of the Scorpio is that enough to pull in consumers and developers? I don’t know, but I’m optimistic.


Written by G. S. Martin


The Problems With Sequels to Beloved Franchises

Recently I’ve been playing through the first Dark Cloud for the first time in over a decade. I don’t remember much beyond the first couple worlds of the game, but the second game is engraved into my brain. It made me think about potential sequels to some of my beloved gaming franchises.  Where’s Dark Cloud 3? Where’s Black 2? Rune Factory 5? City Of Heroes 2? Condemned 3? TimeSplitters 4? Dear lord, just give me a TimeSplitters 4.

Now some of these have valid reasons for not existing such as Rune Factory 5 whose developer has gone out of business. But for games like TimeSplitters which is an IP that was purchased from Free Radical by Crytek, the makers of Crysis, you’d expect there would be a little more pressure put upon them for a true sequel. Sure, we’re supposedly getting a fan made remake of TimeSplitters called TimeSplitters Rewind sometime this year, but that’s not really the same thing, now is it? What makes things worse is when you check back on the history of Crytek’s comments regarding the TimeSplitters IP. It’s a wishy-washy mess of “there’s no interest” to “we’re definitely considering pursuing this, the fans want it” which just seems to make no sense.


It makes me think of games like Yooka-Laylee, a spiritual successor (a term I hate) to the incredible Banjo-Kazooie series. It’s a game born out of its fans and crowdsourcing. Doesn’t that show these big AAA companies potential ways of inquiring about interest? Doesn’t it show someone like Microsoft how stupid they are to have pinned Rare to Kinect games for so long?


In reality the problems are much larger than they seem at surface level. From a business standpoint it almost seems like a giant missed opportunity, but it’s also a case of following trends, looking toward the future and realizing that while some games were great and/or revolutionary in the past, their formulas might not work in today’s gaming world. How much money do you want to spend in practically re-developing an entire IP? The rebirth of a franchise is a lot riskier than it seems. It’s an all or nothing attempt, so if you get it wrong, like Banjo-Kazooie: Nuts and Bolts, it could prove fatal to a whole brand. Who’s going to trust them to get it right the second time? Don’t you think we’ve experienced enough pain with Nuts and Bolts? Why would we let ourselves get hurt like that again? It leaves me torn between wanting a sequel to something I cherish and wanting to preserve the franchises’ legacy. Ultimately, is it worth the risk?


Written by G. S. Martin


Question Of The Week: What Do We Do With Tutorials?

Tutorials in most games bother me, but none of them bother me as much as tutorials in JRPGs. Unfortunately, Persona 5 is no exception. Like everyone else, I’ve been waiting for Persona 5 for what feels like an eternity, so practically shoving the disc into my system was a no-brainer for me when I finally got my grubby little hands on it. I was met with hours long of hand holding. I suppose one could argue that considering a main entry in the Persona series hasn’t been released since Persona 4 in 2008 and Persona 4: Golden for the Vita in 2012 that Atlus wanted to give both old and new players of the franchise an easy way to settle in. The only problem with a process like that is it makes the story and the game feel like they’re dragging. It made me realize how often I’m hit with a problem like this: a sense of struggle to get to the good parts of a game.

Coincidentally, on the same day Persona 5 was released, Drawn To Death was put online as one of PlayStation’s free games with PS Plus and I ran into the same exact problem. For a game that’s all about being fast, hectic and crazy, the idea of a mind-numbingly boring tutorial seems counter intuitive. The real problem with Drawn To Death’s tutorial system is that it doesn’t stop after the section they labeled as a tutorial, it continues on for a few online matches as well. The developers had this uncontrollable urge to explain every single detail to their audience. It makes the experience stutter.

Amidst all this tutorial hell another game seemed to pull away from this pattern and was met with a lot of critical praise. I am of course talking about The Legend of Zelda: Breath Of The Wild. The game abandons almost all ideas of a tutorial. It gives you a few tips for how to use a power here and there, but everything else from the story to the gameplay is completely up to you to figure out and experience on your own. It’s made me wonder. Is this the right way to do a tutorial or is it simply situational? Do developers really think players are too stupid to figure out what the X button does on their own or are they just afraid they’ve made a game that’s so complex in its mechanics that everything needs to be explained? What exactly should we be doing with tutorials?

Let me know your thoughts in the comments!


Written by G. S. Martin